At Whatever Front, by Les Kay

Review by Lynn Houston

original

Sundress Publications, 2016

In At Whatever Front, Les Kay brings his readers to the daily battlegrounds of working class life and excavates them for the commentary they provide on cultural notions of masculinity. Kay’s tightly coiled voice invites us to look at manhood the way Dante gives us a tour of hell or Prufrock invites us to walk lonely city streets with him. This act of looking, of providing witness, is essential to the collection, just as it is to any true war story. Because both war stories and the daily lives of the working class involve bodies that are broken or breaking, ones that die without media fanfare. About the speaker’s father, in “Blue Memento” Kay writes: “his ears hummed / like alarm clocks. . . fresh paper cuts / remapped the calluses of forty years / with tributaries of blood, and his eyes blurred with the repetition of movement. . .” The speaker establishes his lineage as cyborg—part human and part of the machines in the warehouse that formed his father’s physical appearance.

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